Birding Hotspots Where to Go Birding

Mount Lemmon–Control Road-Upper

Coronado National Forest
Mt. Lemmon, Arizona 85619
Control Road Scenic Drive webpage
Control Road Scenic Drive map

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Pima County

Mt. Lemmon–Control Road-upper
Coordinates: 32.4534317, -110.7459211
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Birding in Arizona

About Control Road Scenic Drive
This rough, winding road that snakes up the northeastern slopes of the Santa Catalinas was the first major access route built to the upper reaches of the Santa Catalina Mountains. While some residents refer to the road as the Old Mt. Lemmon Highway, the name “Control Road” is as old as the route itself. When this was the only road up the mountain, it was so narrow in some places that, if two cars met going in opposite directions, they would be unable to pass. The only way to avoid total gridlock was to “control” the road by making its narrow upper segment a one-way road on which the direction of travel was switched at regular intervals. Though the Control Road has been replaced by the paved Catalina Highway as the major access route to the mountain top, it still serves as a popular sight-seeing route for those willing to brave a little rough driving. (It’s been made a little wider, too.) In addition to the fact it is not paved, the Control Road differs from the Catalina Highway in another significant way. The highway and most of the trails that scale the Santa Catalinas are concentrated on the range’s southwestern slopes. The Control Road winds down Mt. Lemmon’s northeastern shoulder, offering a different perspective on the mountain and its surroundings. If you approach the old road via the Catalina Highway, it drops off a high ridge just north of the Loma Linda Picnic Area. As it winds its way down the mountain, through an area of old mines and ranches, the road provides broad overlooks of the grassy, oak-covered foothills to the east. In the distance, the San Pedro Valley stretches to the Galiuro Range. Farther in the distance, the upper slopes of the Pinaleño Mountains and their northern neighbors, the Santa Teresas, are visible through low passes in the Galiuros. The stacks and tailings ponds of the copper smelter at San Manuel complete the panorama.

From the town of Oracle, follow The Old Mt. Lemmon Road to the Forest boundary where it becomes FR-38 and continue up the mountain. From Tucson, follow the Catalina Highway to milepost 24.5, just beyond the Loma Linda Picnic Area, and turn right (northeast) onto FR-38. Follow FR-38 (the Control Road) straight past the Mt. Lemmon Fire Station and a road that forks to the right and continue down the mountain But can be snow covered and impassable in winter.
From Control Road Scenic Drive webpage

Tips for birding Mount Lemmon
Take Catalina Highway northeast from Tanque Verde Road. For desert and mountain species, stop at picnic and campgrounds (Molina Basin, Bear Canyon, Rose Canyon Lake and others) as you drive the narrow, winding road to high elevations.
From Tucson Audubon Society