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Cibola National Forest–Tijeras Ranger Station

Birding in New Mexico

Cibola National Forest
Tijeras Ranger Station

Tijeras, New Mexico 87059
Tijeras Ranger Station webpage
Sandia Crest Trails map
Cibola National Forest website

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Bernalillo County

Cibola NF–Tijeras Ranger Station
Coordinates: 35.0744073, -106.3841182
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About Tijeras Ranger Station
Just east of Albuquerque are the most visited mountains in New Mexico. Millions of people journey into the Sandia Mountains each year. More than half these visitors ride the Sandia Peak Tram or drive the Sandia Crest National Scenic Byway to take in spectacular panoramic views of Central New Mexico and to enjoy many other recreational opportunities. The Four Seasons Visitor Center offers year-round interpretive exhibits and seasonal programs at the upper Tram Building. The Scenic Byway has several newly remodeled picnic grounds with shelters and group areas for reservation.

The Sandia District faces tremendous customer service and urban sprawl challenges in managing the Sandia and Manzanita Mountains. Partnerships with interpretive associations, local friends groups, volunteers, and agency collaboration provide many of the customer support services in the District, including a variety of summer programs such as Bird Walks, WildflowerWalks, and “Star Party” Astronomy Nights.
From Tijeras Ranger Station webpage

About Cibola National Forest
The Cibola National Forest covers more than 1.6 million acres in New Mexico, with elevations ranging from 2,700 feet to over 11,300 feet. We have four ranger districts: Sandia, Mountainair, Magdalena, and Mt. Taylor. In addition, the Cibola has four wilderness areas: Sandia Mountain, Manzano Mountain, Withington, and Apache Kid.
From Cibola National Forest website