eBird Hotspots Where to Go Birding

Long Trail–Route 108 to Mount Mansfield “Adams Apple”

Birding in Vermont

Long Trail
Stowe, Vermont 05672
Long Trail website

Also, see Mount Mansfield

Bar Charts by Season by Month
All Months
Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb
Spring Summer Fall Winter

eBird Hotspot

Lamoille County

Long Trail–Rte. 108 to Mt. Mansfield “Adam’s Apple”
Coordinates: 44.5401957, -72.8026628
eBird links: Hotspot mapView detailsRecent visits
My eBird links: Location life listSubmit data

About Long Trail
Vermont’s Long Trail follows the main ridge of the Green Mountains from the Massachusetts-Vermont line to the Canadian border. Built between 1910 and 1930, it was the vision of James P. Taylor and later became the inspiration for the Appalachian Trail. The LT and AT share 100 miles of trail in the southern part of the state.

On the Long Trail, hikers encounter the best natural features Vermont has to offer, including pristine ponds, alpine sedge, hardwood forests, and swift streams. Known as the “footpath in the wilderness,” it is easy in few sections and rugged in most. Steep inclines and plenty of mud present hikers with plenty of challenges.
Group hiking on the Long Trail

As maintainer and protector of the Long Trail, the Green Mountain Club works in partnership with the Green Mountain National Forest, State of Vermont, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, and private landowners to offer a world-class hiking trail.

The Long Trail is truly the trail for everyone. Each year, hundreds of thru hikers set out to complete the trail in one go, a journey that has been completed in under 5 days but typically takes multiple weeks. Section hikers tackle the trail in bursts, often completing the Long Trail over the course of many years.

Hikers who hike every mile of the Long Trail, whether in day trips, multi-day sections, or all at once, are called “End-to-Enders” and are eligible to register for inclusion in the GMC’s official records.

Most trail users are day hikers, who enjoy desired destinations as day trips without camping out on the trail.
From Long Trail website

About Mount Mansfield
Mount Mansfield is the highest mountain in Vermont with a summit that peaks at 4,395 feet above sea level. The summit is located within the town of Underhill in Chittenden County; the ridgeline, including some secondary peaks, extends into the town of Stowe in Lamoille County, and the mountain’s flanks also reach into the town of Cambridge.

When viewed from the east or west, this mountain has the appearance of a (quite elongated) human profile, with a distinct forehead, nose, lips, chin, and Adam’s apple. These features are most distinct when viewed from the east; unlike most human faces, the chin is the highest point.

Mount Mansfield is one of three spots in Vermont where true alpine tundra survives from the Ice Ages. A few acres exist on Camel’s Hump and Mount Abraham nearby and to the south, but Mount Mansfield’s summit still holds about 200 acres. In 1980, the Mount Mansfield Natural Area was designated as a National Natural Landmark by the National Park Service.

Located in Mount Mansfield State Forest, the mountain is used for various recreational and commercial purposes. “The Nose” is home to transmitter towers for a number of regional radio and TV stations. There are many hiking trails, including the Long Trail, which traverses the main ridgeline. In addition, the east flank of the mountain is used by the Stowe Mountain Resort for winter skiing. A popular tourist activity is to take the 4.5-mile toll road (a steep, mostly unpaved road with several hairpin turns) from the Stowe Base Lodge to “The Nose” and then hike along the ridge to “The Chin.”
From Wikipedia